LLURIA illuminates the “Comuneros: 500 years” exhibition

Lluria iluminacion exposiciones

LED linear lights have become an indispensable tool in exhibition lighting due to their small size, low energy consumption and their many customisation possibilities. In museum lighting, the specifications and installation methods must be taken care of down to the smallest detail to achieve the best result.

Lluria iluminacion exposiciones

This was precisely the challenge set by lighting designers Mariel Fuentes and Michela Mezzavilla when they studied how to solve the lighting of the “Comuneros: 500 years” temporary exhibition, launched on 22 April at the headquarters of the Cortes of Castile and León in Valladolid. “We needed an LED strip with an excellent colour rendering index, a variety of supports and very complete optics to solve the lighting of a set of pieces that are very different from each other,” explain the designers, “and for that reason we opted for the Lluria Nature range.”

Lluria iluminacion exposiciones

Coordinated by Patrimonio Inteligente, and designed by interior designer Beatriz Rubio, the exhibition is dedicated to the organisers of the Revolt of the Comuneros and to those who worked to keep the political, social and historical legacy of the defenders of the communities alive. It exhibits a total of 150 pieces, donated by prominent Spanish institutions and organisations such as the Congress of Deputies, the Prado and National Archaeological Museums, the National Library, Patrimonio Nacional, the Royal Chancery and the Army Museum, as well as private collectors, temples and other institutions of a different nature. The exhibition includes tapestries, paintings, weapons, coins, sculptures, miniatures, bas-reliefs, old documents, books and a wide variety of pieces of great historical and artistic value that are being exhibited together for the first time.

Lluria iluminacion exposiciones

The aim of the exhibition is to represent a key historical moment through different perspectives, to offer a contained, impartial vision, so that it is the viewer who draws their own conclusions.

Lluria iluminacion exposiciones

At the entrance, consistent with this approach, large backlit cylinders welcome the visitors, instantly immersing them in large-scale images of the time for them to observe at leisure, playing with their individual point of view. Specially designed for the exhibition, each of these cylinders is lit by four stretches of LED Nature lights.

Lluria iluminacion exposiciones

Inside the lobby, the pieces are organised along a large red columnar structure and placed in different display cabinets or on pedestals and supports, depending on the origin and nature of each item. In this sense, the use of LED Nature strips has been key to obtaining an excellent final result, due to its ability to optimally and realistically reproduce the reds and the rest of the colour ranges, in addition to the various materials displayed in the exhibition.

Lluria iluminacion exposiciones

The light discourse translates the non-partisan and “democratic” stance of the exhibition story into a simple yet effective light display, providing the same lighting level to all the collections and pairing a specific linear lighting solution with each type of piece. “We categorise different types of pieces and, from there, we work out seven types of lighting, combining different elements of Lluria’s systems: optics with a more closed or open angle and fixed or adjustable frames that are hidden or visible,” Mariel Fuentes points out.

Lluria iluminacion exposiciones

The tapestries and large paintings make use of the ST2D profile, due to its orientability and its more concentrated optics. The profile is hidden in a detail specially conceived by the lighting designers.

Lluria iluminacion exposiciones

Alcoves are lit with 45˚ profiles positioned in different ways depending on the dimensions, the materials and the type of pieces, with different integration details. Freestanding display cabinets also generally make use of built-in 45˚ profiles. Some of the sculptural pieces placed on pedestals are illuminated by integrating the ST2D profile in a custom-designed uplighting detail, for a more dramatic effect.

Lluria iluminacion exposiciones

A purpose designed system with an arm is used to light the most volumetric pieces mounted on the surface of the exhibitors. The texts are also lit with linear lighting, either from the front or through light boxes, depending on the relevance and placement of the text itself within the exhibition.

Lluria iluminacion exposiciones

All the LED strips are DALI dimmable in order to be able to adjust the lighting levels required for the most fragile pieces. The lighting level of each one of these has determined the reference lighting, which the rest of the exhibition has been adapted to.

Lluria iluminacion exposiciones

“In this project it was essential to work very closely with the interior architect from the beginning, to coordinate and define the details of all the linear luminaires in the display cases and cabinets, achieving optimal integration. It is a project carried out with great dedication and attention to detail, taking care of each solution and each item so that it shines to the fullest,” adds Michela Mezzavilla.

Lluria iluminacion exposiciones

It is worth mentioning that the deadlines for executing a project are usually very tight in temporary exhibitions, so, according to the designers, another reason for choosing Lluria was because of the quality of the service offered and the ease of receiving all the material cut to size and organised, ready for installation.

Temporary exhibition “Comuneros: 500 years”
Promoter: Fundación Castilla y León
Project: ElArte Ideas and Patrimoio Inteligente
Museographic design: Studio Azul
Production coordination: Beatriz Rubio from Studio Azul
Lighting Design: Mariel Fuentes from LDLUZ and Michela Mezzavilla from reMM
Photography: Francisco J. De las Heras

Interview with Joan Alsina, founder of AlsinaSech Lighting Projects

Joan Alsina AlsinaSech Lighting Projects

Joan Alsina believes that everyone should be able to enjoy a good lighting project in their homes. That’s why he always adapts to his clients’ budgets, striving to make their dreams come true and finding the best solution to ensure there is one corner of their house where they can enjoy the beauty and poetry of light.

You studied interior design, but in the end, you set up a studio that specialises in lighting projects. When and why did you take the plunge and move into the world of light?

While I was studying interior design, I noticed a guy in my class who worked at Saladié Lighting Projects; whenever we presented assignments, he always brought an additional sheet of paper with the lighting proposal. None of the rest of us ever did, nor did the teachers ask for it. His ideas really caught my eye and I ended up discovering that lighting was the part of interior design that I liked the most.  Eventually we became friends and he introduced me to his boss, who gave me the chance to do my internship at Saladié. That was where I realised just how much lighting excited me, and I was so dedicated and committed that they ended up hiring me.

What should the lighting of the spaces you design be like?

I always look for the best way to trigger emotions through light, to create atmospheres in which people feel comfortable and at ease. I make sure that each component fits perfectly in the project and that the lighting effect is just right. I love working with light and shadow. In fact, I think I’m a shadow lover.

What are the words that would define AlsinaSech Lighting Projects’ work?

I like our projects to breathe the magic and poetry of light while remaining economical and affordable. We love providing a warm and friendly service, and always attending any need and facilitating the most appropriate solution.

Joan Alsina AlsinaSech Lighting Projects

What advice do you give to clients who engage your services to light their homes?

I always stress the importance of installing a warm colour temperature in their homes. Light has a direct influence on our emotions and our moods, and I’m quite sure that a couple living in a house with 4,000 or 5,000k light are going to argue more than a couple who live with 2,700k. Sometimes it is a real struggle to convince them, they don’t understand warm light in the kitchen, for example, but as soon as they see the results they’re delighted. Another important issue in home lighting is to use good materials to achieve visual comfort and to avoid any flickering light sources that impact well-being and health so much. And a third tip is to recommend dimmable lighting, so that they can adjust lighting levels to their different everyday activities. I also show them how to differentiate and use the different layers of direct and indirect lighting, which are more ambient, and accent lighting.

When working on a lighting project, is it important to listen to the architecture?

Absolutely. Unfortunately, I’m almost always called when the house’s architecture has already been defined, when ideally architecture and lighting should grow and develop at the same time. Both should start from scratch and grow together so that they complement each other.

Are LED strips a good way of integrating lighting into architecture?  

Yes, without a doubt, personally I’m using them more and more.

Joan Alsina AlsinaSech Lighting Projects

What are your favourite applications?

Above all, verticals cut in walls, to provide indirect ceiling-to-floor lighting. One effect that I love and that the architect Ramón Esteve uses very often is to build LED strips into porcelain flooring next to walls, which produces a very dramatic gradient on the baseboard. It’s a highly spectacular effect that highlights the architecture, providing a soft and pleasant light effect. I particularly like these two applications, although the one used most commonly is to include the LED strip in a cavity to create a curtain of light on the wall.

Joan Alsina AlsinaSech Lighting Projects

Is it expensive to engage a lighting consultant’s services?

No, not in my case, as I always try to ensure that my expertise does not cost the client anything extra. I work for architects, interior designers and installers and my philosophy is to build a relationship of mutual loyalty, so that what customers pay for the lighting products cover my professionalism and time. I always adapt to the client’s budget, even if I have to be more creative and invent and reinvent the product to strike a balance between cost and aesthetics.

Joan Alsina AlsinaSech Lighting Projects

Interview with Mary Pardo and Susana Barea, founders of Krea Lighting Studio

Krea Lighting Mary Pardo Susana Barea
©alvarovaldecantos

If something characterizes the founders of Krea Lighting Studio it is their accessibility and personal touch. They pride themselves on listening to customers and providing the best strategy, as well as the talent, creative approach and attention to detail that deliver the best solution to every need. They are convinced that their commitment to and enthusiasm for well done work will take them far.

In 2018 you founded your studio, Krea Lighting. What led you to do it together? Were you close friends?

Susana: No, the truth is that we had never worked together, we only met because we had some common suppliers. We were at a decisive point at a time when Mary was deciding between going into teaching or continuing with projects and I had to decide my professional future from among several proposals.

Mary: It was a matter of good vibrations, Susana inspired trust from the very beginning. We only needed to meet a couple of times to decide to combine our knowledge and experience and establish Krea Lighting.

Krea Lighting Mary Pardo Susana Barea
Casa Kub's

Is it difficult to get into the profession as an independent studio? What are the biggest challenges you faced?

Mary:  The biggest challenge is economic. The current pandemic situation is extraordinarily complex. The rest needs dedication and enthusiasm.

Susana: Developing projects is no problem for us, beyond the challenges that each customer poses.  In contrast, all the management and paperwork issues involved in founding a company are time-consuming and are exhausting. In our case, because our premises are on the ground floor and visible from the street, the architectural and regulatory requirements are much greater.

Krea Lighting Mary Pardo Susana Barea
Agrupació Jugadors FCB. ©alvarovaldecantos

The question we must ask is, where does your interest in light come from?

Mary:  My interest in light came by pure chance. When I was quite young, I went to work in a lighting company as an office worker. There I discovered the enormous possibilities light offers to the point that the manager encouraged me to devote myself to it and to study interior design, so I’d have the basics. I fell in love with light from the outset.

Susana: I studied interior design, but when I joined a food company in 2001 that was developing projects for markets, pastry shops, butchers, shops or restaurants, I realized the enormous importance of light in general, and especially how it affected people’s perception of food. But as an interior designer you are not a lighting expert, so I sought out the studies I needed and took the Master in Lighting Design from UPC in Barcelona, of which I am currently coordinator.

Krea Lighting Mary Pardo Susana Barea
Agrupació Jugadors FCB. ©alvarovaldecantos

What kind of projects are you working on?

Susana: The current situation, which allows us to work online, gives us the opportunity to develop all kinds of projects at local, national and international levels. Having the studio in Vic does not limit us in any way. But it is true that the pandemic has boosted housing projects.

Mary:   Currently we are also working on a couple of restaurants, shops, a showroom in Barcelona and on teaching.

Krea Lighting Mary Pardo Susana Barea
Obra exhibeo VM

Have you developed a language that characterizes you as a studio?

Mary:   More than a language or style, I would say that what characterizes our work is that we always listen to our customers to determine their needs. Once they are established, we can develop the most suitable solutions.

Susana: Even if customers don’t know anything about lighting, if they know how they like to live or how they like to work, they understand their needs better than anyone else. Therefore, this initial and close contact is essential for achieving the best results. And I’m not just talking about small projects; we’re always present from the beginning, ready to establish a one-on-one relationship. If something defines us as a studio, it is our accessibility.

Krea Lighting Mary Pardo Susana Barea
Obra ESOROSA. @ZINCBCN

When you establish that close contact with the owners, do you think they are generally sophisticated enough to understand the language of light as the generator of architectural narrative?

Susana: Generally, our customers come to us, which is important because it means they have a specific interest in lighting. Many of them say, ‘I don’t know what or how, but I want it to be well lit’. In our case, after having completed several projects, it is often word of mouth that works best. People come and say, ‘Wow, that has turned out well! Who did it?’ and then they come to us. From when they first show their interest, we try to educate them about how important lighting is as a component in the development of a narrative.

Mary:  Going back to the close personal contact we mentioned before, we not only design the visual project, but we are fully involved: we arrange visits, perform light tests, advise, explain why we have chosen one product or another, advise on the pros and cons… We are totally involved with the architects and installers on site, and we always try to be part of the overall team. We can develop a great project, but if we do not cooperate with the architect, the interior designer and the installer afterwards, it won’t turn out as we want.

Krea Lighting Mary Pardo Susana Barea
Mercat de Olesa. Obra Exhibeo VM. @Pere Grimau

When you talk to architects, interior designers and installers do you need to adapt your language to theirs, so that the projects can be successfully implemented?

Susana: The difference between them and us is that when we work with architects and interior designers, they perceive us as a plus in their work. Installers, however, often see us as competitors that invade their area and will make their lives more difficult. In fact, many of them come straight out with it. Our relationship with installers is more complex, but the results speak for themselves. Once they see the finished project and the relationship has gone smoothly, they end up acknowledging our contribution.

Mary:  It depends on the project. In our case, we know installers who are regular customers and who call us directly. We have recently worked on a series of homes and it was the installer who invited us to take part, because we add value to their work. Although there are all kinds attitudes, fortunately some people are beginning to appreciate us.

Krea Lighting Mary Pardo Susana Barea
Mercat de Olesa. Obra Exhibeo VM. @Pere Grimau

Do you like to use lines of light in your projects?

Susana: A lot. They are excellent for emphasising architecture and hiding the light source.

Mary:   They are practical; they give great results and are easy to incorporate into projects. At the moment we are involved in modular houses for which we have made a prototype that incorporates several light lines. And we always work with Lluria, because of their proximity, efficient service and problem-solving capability. It’s a company with a great team behind it.

Susana: Yes, and another point in their favour is that their catalogue enables us to choose from a wide variety of profile and linear led models, whether for a project that requires the highest quality or for lower budget projects. And what we appreciate most is their ability to adapt when making custom lengths. We find it very practical and the installers are more than happy with the results.

Krea Lighting
Vivienda Vilaseca Interiorisme. @ZINCBCN

The three types of linear lighting in the home

iluminación lineal viviendas Lluria

Linear lighting has revolutionised the way interiors are conceived and designed. One example would be to consider how complicated it used to be to avoid putting in ceiling lights or to resolve details when it came to building light into the furniture. Today, linear LEDs, with all the available formats and finishes, have opened up an infinite array of possibilities for lighting solutions in all sorts of spaces and construction details.

In the home sector, there are countless linear lighting applications that make it possible to set up a perfect, flexible and visually appealing solution.

iluminación lineal viviendas Lluria
Baño vivienda. Solertia. VAM Arquitectos & Vié Il·luminació.

TYPES OF LIGHTING

There are three basic types of lighting that are combined and interact with one another, to create the ideal atmosphere in a home:

. General or ambient lighting
. Occasional or accent lighting
. Task lighting

Linear LEDs provide solutions for each of these types of lighting. So, in both this article and subsequent ones, we will be exploring the diverse applications that exist today for the different spaces that make up a home.

TIPOS DE ILUMINACIÓN Existen tres tipos básicos de iluminación con los que crear la atmósfera perfecta en una vivienda, combinándolos e interactuando entre sí: . Iluminación general o de ambiente . Iluminación puntual o de acento . Iluminación para tareas Los LED lineales aportan soluciones a cada una de estas tipologías, así que, en este artículo y en los siguientes, vamos a repasar las distintas aplicaciones que existen para los diferentes espacios que componen una vivienda.
Vivienda Bilbao

GENERAL OR AMBIENT LIGHTING

This type of lighting is designed to create an ideally uniform level of general lighting, to identify the space and enable users to move about within it safely. Generally speaking, the light emitted is soft, diffused or indirect and can be regulated to adapt to day and night-time setups. Usually, this lighting is not enough to enable users to perform certain activities beneath it or to highlight specific objects or elements around the room, yet it is fundamental to create sensations.

For this purpose, linear LED lighting is a major innovation, as it provides general lighting with no need to install any sort of recess or surface lights in the ceiling. For hidden general lighting using linear LEDs, here are some of the most frequently found solutions:

. Perimeter recesses facing the walls
. Perimeter recesses facing the ceiling
. Hidden indirect lighting above structural elements or furniture

Of course, linear lights can also be hung or installed on surfaces in plain view, if the idea is not to integrate the lighting into the architecture.

iluminación lineal viviendas Lluria
Vivienda en Vilanova. Saladie + Energia 32 Studios SLP-AMCA Architecture

TASK LIGHTING

This is an intense and direct source of light that is necessary for specific activities that are carried out in the home, such as reading, studying, working, cooking, putting on makeup, sewing, ironing and doing arts and crafts. It provides a greater level of light in the specific area where the activity is carried out, as an additional reinforcement to the general lighting. In this case, linear LEDs are placed closer to the work surface. The applications would be as follows:

. Linear lights built into the furniture (kitchens, offices, bathrooms and mirrors)
. Hanging lights close to the work surface
. Portable floor or table lamps

To be efficient, lighting must provide a considerable luminous flux that can be controlled at the same time, to prevent glares and visual fatigue.

iluminacion viviendas
Vivienda Barcelona. Punto Luz

ACCENT LIGHTING

Accent lighting is designed to highlight a specific object or area, generating a contrast with the ambient lighting. Accent lighting draws attention to certain elements in the home, such as architectural details, materials and textures, works of art, plants, and shelves featuring books or other objects, making each one of those elements a focal point in the space.

Traditionally, occasional and adjustable lights were used for this purpose, yet linear lighting is offering increasingly more solutions for these needs, with miniature LED lights and LEDS built into the furniture. Here are a few examples:

. Linear lighting built into details of the furniture
. Linear floor lighting
. Linear lighting for wall washing

The main aim of accent lighting is to draw the eye to a specific area, creating a point of interest and visual enjoyment.

iluminacion viviendas Lluria
Apartamento en Lanzarote. Maraba Studio

Hence, when selecting the type of lighting for a given area of the home, the first step is to identify the types of activities that will be carried out there. Very often, a single room in the home is used for several different purposes. For example, the living room can provide a reading area, a place to relax, a dining area and a place to watch television. In keeping with this conceptual framework, in the upcoming articles we will be offering you helpful guidelines for the use of linear lighting in specific household areas.